Texas Tough & Orange is the New Black Book Review

Thought you might be interested…… 🙂

For the file– Click HERE:  Texas Tough & Orange is the New Black Book Review

orange-is-the-new-black-poster1Texas Tough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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John Dower’s Website (focusing on image-driven scholarship)

Click this link:  John Dower’s Website (focusing on image-driven scholarship)

What is Visualizing Cultures? 

Visualizing Cultures weds images and scholarly commentary in innovative ways to illuminate social and cultural history. Founded in 2002 by MIT Professors John Dower and Shigeru Miyagawa, Visualizing Cultures exploits the unique qualities of the Web as a publishing platform to enable scholars, teachers, and others to: (1) examine large bodies of previously inaccessible images; (2) compose original texts with unlimited numbers of full-color, high-resolution images; and (3) use new technology to explore unprecedented ways of analyzing and presenting images that open windows on modern history.

Visualizing Cultures has positioned itself as a nexus between the institutions that house image collections and the scholars who would like to use them for research purposes. Publishing on MIT’s revolutionary OpenCourseWare—making MIT courses freely available on the Web—Visualizing Cultures has worked with many institutions to negotiate online publication of images for educational purposes using a creative commons license.

[taken from: http://ocw.mit.edu/ans7870/21f/21f.027/home/vc01_about.html]

 

Bibliography for Paper

Responding to/In Conversation with:

Mott and Roberts (supported by Garrett and Hawkins) “observation of the need for a ‘sustained critical treatment of the range of visual images produced by urban explorers’” (Motts and Roberts 2013, 4).

&

Garrett and Hawkins’ statement that “[f]or the potential production of a politics of urban exploration, we urge an examination of both the representational and the affective forces of these images” (Garrett and Hawkins 2013, 12-13).

&

DeSilvey and Edensor’s suggestion that academic research into urban ruins thus far “opens up scope for non-representational investigations of ruins, which, by drawing on current research into embodied geographies, might moderate the overriding focus on the visual in ruin scholarship and focus attention on the ways in which the material qualities of runs afford particular sensual and affective experiences” (DeSilvey and Edensor, 2012, 480)

FOCUS:  subject-body/place relations and the “imaginative spaces” opened up/the potential for reframing body-environment relationships through their artistic images

With particular focus on:

  • their “deployment of the (often nude) female form” as an artist device that frames body-subject/place relations)
  • “affective intensities” of their images
  • application of non-representational/more-than-representational theories

Specific Archive:

Miru Kim (works of (primary emphasis) and comments made by)

Sarah R. Bloom (works of (primary emphasis) and comments made by)

Sources/Bibliography:

Anderson, B., & Harrison, P. (Eds.). (2010). Taking-Place: Non-Representational Theories and Geography. Farnham: Ashgate. Cadman, L. (2009). Non-representational Theory/Non-representational geographies. In R. Kitchin & N. Thrift (Eds.), International Encyclopaedia of Human Geography (pp. 429-452). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Bennett, L. (2013, November 28). Entangled bodies: urban exploration, matter and meaning making. In lukebennett 13 wordpress.com blog. Retrieved February 19, 2014, from http://lukebennett13.wordpress.com/2013/11/28/entangled-bodies-urban-exploration-matter-and-meaning-making/#comments

Bloom, S. (2007). A Different View. N.p.: Blurb.

Bloom, S. (2008-2013). Archives. In Sad and Beautiful World PHOTOGRAPHY/ART BLOG OF SARAH R. BLOOM. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://www.sadandbeautiful.com/archives.html

Bloom, S. (2011). Self, Abandoned. N.p.: Blurb.

Bloom, S. (2011). Totally Exposed: I Fall and I Rise. Self Published Exhibit Art Compilation.

Bloom, S. (2012, October 9). Urban exploration, Nude Self-portraits, and Me. In Snap My Life. Retrieved February 24, 2014, from http://blog.snapmylife.com/post/33228273020/urban-exploration-nude-self-portraits-and-me

Bloom, S. (2014). About the Artist. In Sad and Beautiful World PHOTOGRAPHY/ART BLOG OF SARAH R. BLOOM. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://www.sadandbeautiful.com/about-the-artist.html

Bloom, S. (2014). From the Desk of. In Sarah R. Bloom: Photography. Retrieved February 22, 2014, from http://sarahrbloom.com/artist-blog

Bloom, S. (2014). Selected Exhibitions and Publications. In Sarah R. Bloom: Photography. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://sarahrbloom.com/resume

Bloom, S. (2014). Self-portraits. In Sarah R. Bloom: Photography. Retrieved February 22, 2014, from http://sarahrbloom.com/work/self-portraits

Bohnsack, R. (2008, September). The Interpretation of Pictures and the Documentary Method. Art, 9(3).

Buzzell, C. (2007, December). Miru Kim Takes Pictures. Esquire, 148(6), 178-182.

Colls R (2012) Feminism, bodily difference, and non-representational geographies. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers NS 37(3): 430-445

DeSilvey, C., & Edensor, T. (2012). Reckoning with ruins. Progress in Human Geography, 37(6), 465-485.

Edensor T (2006) Social practices, sensual excess, and aesthetic transgression in industrial ruins. In K Frank and Q Stevens (eds) Loose Space: Opportunities for Public Life. London: Routledge.

England M R and Simon S (2010) Scary cities: Urban geographies of fear, difference, and belonging. Social and Cultural Geography 11(3): 201-207

Fassi III, A. (2013). Manufacturing Ruin Doctoral dissertation, 201 – 205 specifically

Garrett B & Hawkins H (2013)  ‘And now for something completely different
 thinking through explorer subject-bodies: A response to Mott and Roberts’. Antipode Discussion Paper, 11 November 2013

Garrett B L (2013) The affectual affordances of industrial urban exploration. In H Orange and S Penrose (eds) Reanimating Industrial Spaces. Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press

Gibberd, B. (2007, July 29). Children of Darkness. The New York Times.

Grosz E (1992) Bodies-Cities. In B Colomina and J Bloomer (eds) Sexuality and Space. Boston: Princeton Architectural Press: 241-254

Grosz E (1994) Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press

Grosz E (2005) Time Travels: Feminism, Nature, Power. Sydney: Allen and Unwin

Jones A (2012) Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts. London: Routledge

Jones A and Warr T (2012) The Artist’s Body. London: Phaidon

Kabesh, A. T. (2011). On Being Haunted By the Present. Borderlands, 10(2), 1-21.

Kim, M. (Actor and Producer). Roussel, I. (Producer). (2008). Blind Door [film].

Kim, M. (Actor and Producer). Roussel, I. (Producer). (2008). Blind Window [film].

Kim, M. (n.d.). Bio & Resumé. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/biography.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). Istanbul. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/projectsTurkey.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). LĂłdz Biennale. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/projectsLodz.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). Naked City Spleen. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/photosNakedCitySpleen.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). POPULATING MY SOLITUDE. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/statementNakedCitySpleen.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). The Pig That Therefore I Am. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/statementThePigThatThereforeIAm.php

Kim, M. (Producer). Harray, D. (Director). (2008). A Dream Play under NYC [film].

Knoblauch, H., Baer, A., Laurier, E., Petschke, S., & Schnettler, B. (2008, September). Visual Analysis. New Developments in the Interpretative Analysis of Video and Photography. Art, 9(3).

Latham A and McCormack D P (2009) Thinking with images in non-representational cities: Vignettes from Berlin. Area 41(3):252-262

Maysles, A. (Director). (2011). Close up: Photographers at Work, Miru Ki [Ovation TV documentary].

McCormack D (2003) An event of geographical ethics in spaces of affect. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers NS 28(4):488-507

Mott C and Roberts S M (2013) Not everyone has (the) balls: Urban exploration and the persistence of masculinist geography. Antipode DOI: 10.111.anti.12033

Olstead R (2011) Gender, space, and fear: A study of women’s edgework. Emotion, Space, and Society 4(2): 86-94

Paglen T (2010) Goatsucker: Toward a spatial theory of state secrecy. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 28(5): 759-771

Prescott H (2011) Reclaiming ruins: Childbirth, ruination, and urban exploration photography of the ruined maternity ward. Women’s Studies Quarterly 39:113-132

Thrift N (1997) The still point: Resistance, expressive embodiment, and dance. In S Pile and M Keith (eds) Geographies of Resistance. New York: Routledge.

Thrift N (2010) Halos: Finding space in the world for new political forms. In B Braun and S J Whatmore (eds) Political Matter. Technoscience, Democracy, and Public Life. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 139-174

Thrift, N. (2008). Non-Representational Theory: Space, Politics, Affect. New York: Routledge.

Wilson E (1993) The Sphinx in the City: Urban Life, the Control of Disorder, and Women. Berkeley: University of California Press

 

Miru Kim’s Naked City Spleen

Click Here:  Miru Kim’s Naked City Spleen

Revere Sugar Factory, Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY, USA  As I started venturing out in 2005 to neighborhoods with industrial ruins, I immediately fell in love with Red Hook. The Revere Sugar Factory is the first abandoned factory I entered alone. After seeing its giant dome in a Brooklyn waterfront tour video, I hopped on the F train to Smith 9th street, a stop at which I had never gotten off before. Walking in the general direction of the waterfront, I came across deserted parks, housing projects, giant empty grain silos, and 19th-century brick warehouses. It was no wonder that Al Capone started out in that very neighborhood as a small-time criminal and got the wound that lead to his nickname, “Scarface.” It was a late afternoon, and the silence of the streets made me apprehensive. Walking along Beard Street, I saw an abandoned warehouse with a small hole in the fence I could barely fit through. Only after some minutes of being inside did I realize I was already in the six-acre sugar factory complex.

Revere Sugar Factory, Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY, USA
As I started venturing out in 2005 to neighborhoods with industrial ruins, I immediately fell in love with Red Hook. The Revere Sugar Factory is the first abandoned factory I entered alone. After seeing its giant dome in a Brooklyn waterfront tour video, I hopped on the F train to Smith 9th street, a stop at which I had never gotten off before. Walking in the general direction of the waterfront, I came across deserted parks, housing projects, giant empty grain silos, and 19th-century brick warehouses. It was no wonder that Al Capone started out in that very neighborhood as a small-time criminal and got the wound that lead to his nickname, “Scarface.” It was a late afternoon, and the silence of the streets made me apprehensive. Walking along Beard Street, I saw an abandoned warehouse with a small hole in the fence I could barely fit through. Only after some minutes of being inside did I realize I was already in the six-acre sugar factory complex.

Photography of Sarah R. Bloom – Snap My Life

Supplication Shot in an abandoned girls’ school in the countryside of Kent, United Kingdom. These windows were glorious. I shot several images I love right in front of those windows! A “supplication” is a prayer, a humble plea to a higher being, a request. I’m not Catholic and I’m not religious, but religious iconography and imagery as found in art throughout history has most certainly influenced me as an artist. Seeking humble acceptance of my life, my body, is something I struggle to do—to let go of that ‘prison’, it is one of my prayers to the Universe (my supplication).

Reflections of the Way Things Used to Be Shot in an abandoned warehouse in Detroit, Michigan. Reflections can always create a fascinating image for me, and in this photo I was very deliberate that I wanted to incorporate the reflection in this way. A reaching out to the past—the me I used to be—in both remembrance and farewell.

Burden of Proof Shot in part of an abandoned coal breaker in rural Pennsylvania. I’ve noticed that I often find myself mimicking scenes and ideas from Charlie Chaplain’s “Modern Times” when faced with large machinery, thinking of the machine as an extension of myself. Feeling run down, yet tied to the inevitable passing of time.

CLICK HERE:  Photography of Sarah R. Bloom – Snap My Life

Topic Proposal

I am wavering between two different projects: both of which need narrowing and further focus.

Background/Foundational Interest:

– Key concepts of interest: politics of disposability, culture of disposability, global capitalism, discourses of US empire (especially contemporary war rhetoric), urban ruins, dystopian literature

I am very interested in the concept of disposability and waste, especially in how discourses of disposability pervade and are actively encouraged (possibly) by the United States government and capitalist projects (including the media, corporations etc).  More specifically I am very interested in how these discourses manifest in material reality and in everyday social practices and lives.

I am slowly forming the opinion that the United States (although not exclusively) is particularly invested in fostering/creating a culture and politics of disposability as a tool of empire building, especially utilizing this concept to build a particular national identity and culture.  I suspect, that global capitalism and neoliberal thought plays a central role in this process, perhaps serving partially as the origin and more arguably the catalyst for such an agenda.  I am of course interested in how the United States engages in disseminating and incorporating a certain politic of disposability, whether this be through the American corporation initiatives of planned obsolescence, (encouraged) reliance on consumerism, or war rhetoric naturalizing soldier deaths in America’s current state of “terror” (and consequently perpetual war), the exportation of American waste to “third” world countries or minority/poverty stricken areas, and the list continues.

However, I would like to focus on my study specifically on one of two different archives that I find fascinating: urban ruins and the rise of young adult dystopian literature.  I am just uncertain of which research questions/methods/theoretical bases are most appropriate.  Also,  I am debating which idea I should pursue, although I am leaning toward urban ruins.

Idea # 1:

I would like to pose my questions of US investment in a politic or culture of disposability to the study of urban ruins and urban exploration.  Specifically, I would like to explore what role urban exploration and urban ruins play within this discussion and what an analysis of this role reveals about US identity as well as anxieties and thoughts about contemporary US governance.  I am particularly interested what urban ruins represent for contemporary society.

Some questions that I have include:

What is so mournful and/or beautiful about these images?  What is so appealing about these spaces that people actively engage in illegal activities in order to access these spaces?  How does this “forbidden,” but very rarely policed, search for the aesthetics of urban ruins affect public consciousness (especially in examples such as Detroit – an almost mecca for urban ruins/explorers)?  What about these ruins evoke feelings of an “authentic” experience?  Does this provide a certain commentary on American modernity and progress?  In what way do these spaces disrupt and support national agendas?  What does the lack of “policing” suggest in an era of increased/ing surveillance?  Why has American ruins not been more “museumified” or “memorialized” in the ways that European industrial ruins have been?  Also, what does it mean when these ruins become commercialized or taken over in capitalist projects such as the guided tours of urban ruins emerging in areas like Detroit?  How do these ruins reflect American’s views toward waste, ruin, and disposability?  Why and how might the US government be invested in these views?

Idea # 2:

I would like to explore the increasing popularity and rise of young adult dystopian literature.  Specifically, I would like to see how the concept of disposability play within young adult dystopian literature and how this might reveal possible US investment in this politic.  I would like to look at the emergent themes within these novels in order to understand how dominant discourses of the US government are incorporated and articulated through these themes.  I am especially interested in why these novels are specifically targeted toward children (as opposed to adults) and what is so particularly resonant for this age demographic, although many could argue that adults also enjoy and find these novels resonant and relevant.  I am interested in why these books themselves are not banned or discouraged in the ways that adult dystopian novels like Brave New World or 1984 were.  I also question what about US society is evoking such anxieties and fears at this particular time (for example comparing a prior increase in popular dystopian publications during the Cold War which was, among other things, a time of increased anxiety about government interference/involvement).

Working Source List for Idea # 1:

  • Briante, S. C. (2006). American Ruins: Nostalgia, Amnesia, and Blitzdkrieg Bop Doctoral dissertation
  • Dawdy, S. L. (2010, December). Clockpunk Anthropology and the Ruins of Modernity. Current Anthropology, 51(6), 761-793.
  • Fassi, A. J. (2010). Industrial Ruins, Urban Exploring, and the Postindustrial Picturesque. The New Centennial Review, 10(1), 141-152.
  • Fershau, R. (2002). Modern Urban Ruins: Landscapes of Decay (Master’s thesis).
  • Kabesh, A. T. (2011). On Being Haunted By the Present. Borderlands, 10(2), 1-21.
  • Nayar, K. I. (2012). Reclaiming A Fallen Empire: Myth and Memory in the Battle Over Detroit’s Ruins (Master’s thesis).

Working Source List for Idea # 2:

  • Campbell, J. (2010). The Order and the Other: Power and Subjectivity in Young Adult Science Fiction and Dystopian Literature for Adolescents Doctoral dissertation
  • Gainer, M. G. (2012). Dystopia and Loci of Power: Language, Landscape, and Survival Doctoral dissertation
  • Hall, A. (2007). Dyscontent: The Critical Dystopia in 21st Century American Culture (Master’s thesis).
  • Lempke, C. (2012). Adding More “Diss” to Dystopia: The New Manifestations of Dystopia and Dystopian (Anti)Heroes in Postmodern Graphic Novels and Adolescent Literature (Master’s thesis).
  • Marshall-Rubin, A. (2009). Teenage Wasteland: The Painful Journeys and Tragic-Ambiguous Fates of Antiestablishement Heroes in Young Adult Literature (Master’s thesis).
  • McAlear, R. D. (2010). Dystopian Resistance: Politics and Form in Contemporary American Dystopian Fiction Doctoral dissertation
  • Texter, D. (2009). All the World A School: Utopian Literature as a Critique of Education Doctoral dissertation