Entangled bodies: urban exploration, matter and meaning making

lukebennett13

MiruKim3

Entanglement as a term aims to allow a materialism but

embedded within the social, the historical, the contingent.”

Hodder (2012: 96)

What does it mean to be embodied? That seems to be the contested territory standing between Garrett & Hawkins (2013) and Mott & Roberts (2013a & b) in their recent Antipode exchange. Garrett & Hawkins table a body/environment ‘entanglement’ (Hodder 2012) as the object of a new era of research into urban exploration. Mott & Roberts (2013b) counter that the main thrust of their critique of existing scholarship remains unaddressed: namely where is the appreciation of embodied difference amongst those who do – and those who don’t do – urban exploration?

Mott & Roberts’ approach is broadly concerned with the social: how can this practice be culturally situated? How can it be understood in terms of identity politics? Who is dominating this practice, and whose voices…

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John Dower’s Website (focusing on image-driven scholarship)

Click this link:  John Dower’s Website (focusing on image-driven scholarship)

What is Visualizing Cultures? 

Visualizing Cultures weds images and scholarly commentary in innovative ways to illuminate social and cultural history. Founded in 2002 by MIT Professors John Dower and Shigeru Miyagawa, Visualizing Cultures exploits the unique qualities of the Web as a publishing platform to enable scholars, teachers, and others to: (1) examine large bodies of previously inaccessible images; (2) compose original texts with unlimited numbers of full-color, high-resolution images; and (3) use new technology to explore unprecedented ways of analyzing and presenting images that open windows on modern history.

Visualizing Cultures has positioned itself as a nexus between the institutions that house image collections and the scholars who would like to use them for research purposes. Publishing on MIT’s revolutionary OpenCourseWare—making MIT courses freely available on the Web—Visualizing Cultures has worked with many institutions to negotiate online publication of images for educational purposes using a creative commons license.

[taken from: http://ocw.mit.edu/ans7870/21f/21f.027/home/vc01_about.html]

 

Beyond the Ruins of the Creative City: Berlin’s Factory of Culture and the Sabotage of Rent

Art within/of Ruins – Double-Edged?

PANKOV

eine Geschichte die Kunstruine in Berlin

by Matteo Pasquinelli

Coming of age in the heyday of punk, it was clear were living at the end of something — of modernism, of the American dream, of the industrial economy, of a certain kind of urbanism. The evidence was all around us in the ruins of the cities… Urban ruins were the emblematic places for this era, the places that gave punk part of its aesthetic, and like most aesthetics this one contained an ethic, a worldview with a mandate on how to act, how to live… A city is built to resemble a conscious mind, a network that can calculate, administrate, manufacture. Ruins become the unconscious of a city, its memory, unknown, darkness, lost lands, and in this truly bring it to life. With ruins a city springs free of its plans into something as intricate as life, something that can be explored but perhaps not mapped…

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The Atemporality of “Ruin Porn”: The Carcass & the Ghost by Sarah Wanenchak

Things to Consider….

Discard Studies

*This post originally appeared on Cyborgology.

Objects have lives. They are witness to things.
–This American Life, “The House on Loon Lake”

Atlantic Cities’ feature on the psychology of “ruin porn” is worth a look–in part because it’s interesting in itself, in part because it features some wonderful images, and in part because it has a great deal to do with both a piece I posted previously on Michael Chrisman’s photograph of a year and with the essay that piece referenced, Nathan Jurgenson’s take on the phenomenon of faux-vintage photography.

All of these pieces are, to a greater or lesser extent, oriented around a singular idea: atemporality – that the intermeshing and interweaving of the physical and digital causes us not only to experience both of those categories differently, but to perceive time itself differently; that for most of us, time is no longer a linear experience (assuming it…

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Ruins of the Future – An Extract

Ruins and Futurity

Waste Effects

An extended version of this post appears in Aesthetic Fatigue: Modernity and the Language of Waste, ed. John Scanlan & J. F. M. Clark (Cambridge Scholars, 2013) pp. 141-162.

If waste is taken to denote change, a coming to be by having been, then the anticipation of ruins mark out the present as the condition of the future. One of the narratological effects of imagining the present in a ruined condition is the strong emphasis that this places on ruins’ relation to the present and the dynamic vigour of ending. As a form of waste, the ruin is both an end and a continuity, both the end to use and the muted remainder of that activity. Whilst future ruins frequently suggest the termination of some time, people or structure, there is a lingering or remaining sense of time, a time that is particular to the condition of being ‘leftover’. This…

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Bibliography for Paper

Responding to/In Conversation with:

Mott and Roberts (supported by Garrett and Hawkins) “observation of the need for a ‘sustained critical treatment of the range of visual images produced by urban explorers’” (Motts and Roberts 2013, 4).

&

Garrett and Hawkins’ statement that “[f]or the potential production of a politics of urban exploration, we urge an examination of both the representational and the affective forces of these images” (Garrett and Hawkins 2013, 12-13).

&

DeSilvey and Edensor’s suggestion that academic research into urban ruins thus far “opens up scope for non-representational investigations of ruins, which, by drawing on current research into embodied geographies, might moderate the overriding focus on the visual in ruin scholarship and focus attention on the ways in which the material qualities of runs afford particular sensual and affective experiences” (DeSilvey and Edensor, 2012, 480)

FOCUS:  subject-body/place relations and the “imaginative spaces” opened up/the potential for reframing body-environment relationships through their artistic images

With particular focus on:

  • their “deployment of the (often nude) female form” as an artist device that frames body-subject/place relations)
  • “affective intensities” of their images
  • application of non-representational/more-than-representational theories

Specific Archive:

Miru Kim (works of (primary emphasis) and comments made by)

Sarah R. Bloom (works of (primary emphasis) and comments made by)

Sources/Bibliography:

Anderson, B., & Harrison, P. (Eds.). (2010). Taking-Place: Non-Representational Theories and Geography. Farnham: Ashgate. Cadman, L. (2009). Non-representational Theory/Non-representational geographies. In R. Kitchin & N. Thrift (Eds.), International Encyclopaedia of Human Geography (pp. 429-452). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Bennett, L. (2013, November 28). Entangled bodies: urban exploration, matter and meaning making. In lukebennett 13 wordpress.com blog. Retrieved February 19, 2014, from http://lukebennett13.wordpress.com/2013/11/28/entangled-bodies-urban-exploration-matter-and-meaning-making/#comments

Bloom, S. (2007). A Different View. N.p.: Blurb.

Bloom, S. (2008-2013). Archives. In Sad and Beautiful World PHOTOGRAPHY/ART BLOG OF SARAH R. BLOOM. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://www.sadandbeautiful.com/archives.html

Bloom, S. (2011). Self, Abandoned. N.p.: Blurb.

Bloom, S. (2011). Totally Exposed: I Fall and I Rise. Self Published Exhibit Art Compilation.

Bloom, S. (2012, October 9). Urban exploration, Nude Self-portraits, and Me. In Snap My Life. Retrieved February 24, 2014, from http://blog.snapmylife.com/post/33228273020/urban-exploration-nude-self-portraits-and-me

Bloom, S. (2014). About the Artist. In Sad and Beautiful World PHOTOGRAPHY/ART BLOG OF SARAH R. BLOOM. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://www.sadandbeautiful.com/about-the-artist.html

Bloom, S. (2014). From the Desk of. In Sarah R. Bloom: Photography. Retrieved February 22, 2014, from http://sarahrbloom.com/artist-blog

Bloom, S. (2014). Selected Exhibitions and Publications. In Sarah R. Bloom: Photography. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://sarahrbloom.com/resume

Bloom, S. (2014). Self-portraits. In Sarah R. Bloom: Photography. Retrieved February 22, 2014, from http://sarahrbloom.com/work/self-portraits

Bohnsack, R. (2008, September). The Interpretation of Pictures and the Documentary Method. Art, 9(3).

Buzzell, C. (2007, December). Miru Kim Takes Pictures. Esquire, 148(6), 178-182.

Colls R (2012) Feminism, bodily difference, and non-representational geographies. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers NS 37(3): 430-445

DeSilvey, C., & Edensor, T. (2012). Reckoning with ruins. Progress in Human Geography, 37(6), 465-485.

Edensor T (2006) Social practices, sensual excess, and aesthetic transgression in industrial ruins. In K Frank and Q Stevens (eds) Loose Space: Opportunities for Public Life. London: Routledge.

England M R and Simon S (2010) Scary cities: Urban geographies of fear, difference, and belonging. Social and Cultural Geography 11(3): 201-207

Fassi III, A. (2013). Manufacturing Ruin Doctoral dissertation, 201 – 205 specifically

Garrett B & Hawkins H (2013)  ‘And now for something completely different… thinking through explorer subject-bodies: A response to Mott and Roberts’. Antipode Discussion Paper, 11 November 2013

Garrett B L (2013) The affectual affordances of industrial urban exploration. In H Orange and S Penrose (eds) Reanimating Industrial Spaces. Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press

Gibberd, B. (2007, July 29). Children of Darkness. The New York Times.

Grosz E (1992) Bodies-Cities. In B Colomina and J Bloomer (eds) Sexuality and Space. Boston: Princeton Architectural Press: 241-254

Grosz E (1994) Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press

Grosz E (2005) Time Travels: Feminism, Nature, Power. Sydney: Allen and Unwin

Jones A (2012) Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts. London: Routledge

Jones A and Warr T (2012) The Artist’s Body. London: Phaidon

Kabesh, A. T. (2011). On Being Haunted By the Present. Borderlands, 10(2), 1-21.

Kim, M. (Actor and Producer). Roussel, I. (Producer). (2008). Blind Door [film].

Kim, M. (Actor and Producer). Roussel, I. (Producer). (2008). Blind Window [film].

Kim, M. (n.d.). Bio & Resumé. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/biography.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). Istanbul. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/projectsTurkey.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). Lódz Biennale. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/projectsLodz.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). Naked City Spleen. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/photosNakedCitySpleen.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). POPULATING MY SOLITUDE. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/statementNakedCitySpleen.php

Kim, M. (n.d.). The Pig That Therefore I Am. In Miru Kim. Retrieved February 16, 2014, from http://www.mirukim.com/statementThePigThatThereforeIAm.php

Kim, M. (Producer). Harray, D. (Director). (2008). A Dream Play under NYC [film].

Knoblauch, H., Baer, A., Laurier, E., Petschke, S., & Schnettler, B. (2008, September). Visual Analysis. New Developments in the Interpretative Analysis of Video and Photography. Art, 9(3).

Latham A and McCormack D P (2009) Thinking with images in non-representational cities: Vignettes from Berlin. Area 41(3):252-262

Maysles, A. (Director). (2011). Close up: Photographers at Work, Miru Ki [Ovation TV documentary].

McCormack D (2003) An event of geographical ethics in spaces of affect. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers NS 28(4):488-507

Mott C and Roberts S M (2013) Not everyone has (the) balls: Urban exploration and the persistence of masculinist geography. Antipode DOI: 10.111.anti.12033

Olstead R (2011) Gender, space, and fear: A study of women’s edgework. Emotion, Space, and Society 4(2): 86-94

Paglen T (2010) Goatsucker: Toward a spatial theory of state secrecy. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 28(5): 759-771

Prescott H (2011) Reclaiming ruins: Childbirth, ruination, and urban exploration photography of the ruined maternity ward. Women’s Studies Quarterly 39:113-132

Thrift N (1997) The still point: Resistance, expressive embodiment, and dance. In S Pile and M Keith (eds) Geographies of Resistance. New York: Routledge.

Thrift N (2010) Halos: Finding space in the world for new political forms. In B Braun and S J Whatmore (eds) Political Matter. Technoscience, Democracy, and Public Life. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 139-174

Thrift, N. (2008). Non-Representational Theory: Space, Politics, Affect. New York: Routledge.

Wilson E (1993) The Sphinx in the City: Urban Life, the Control of Disorder, and Women. Berkeley: University of California Press

 

Miru Kim’s Naked City Spleen

Click Here:  Miru Kim’s Naked City Spleen

Revere Sugar Factory, Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY, USA  As I started venturing out in 2005 to neighborhoods with industrial ruins, I immediately fell in love with Red Hook. The Revere Sugar Factory is the first abandoned factory I entered alone. After seeing its giant dome in a Brooklyn waterfront tour video, I hopped on the F train to Smith 9th street, a stop at which I had never gotten off before. Walking in the general direction of the waterfront, I came across deserted parks, housing projects, giant empty grain silos, and 19th-century brick warehouses. It was no wonder that Al Capone started out in that very neighborhood as a small-time criminal and got the wound that lead to his nickname, “Scarface.” It was a late afternoon, and the silence of the streets made me apprehensive. Walking along Beard Street, I saw an abandoned warehouse with a small hole in the fence I could barely fit through. Only after some minutes of being inside did I realize I was already in the six-acre sugar factory complex.

Revere Sugar Factory, Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY, USA
As I started venturing out in 2005 to neighborhoods with industrial ruins, I immediately fell in love with Red Hook. The Revere Sugar Factory is the first abandoned factory I entered alone. After seeing its giant dome in a Brooklyn waterfront tour video, I hopped on the F train to Smith 9th street, a stop at which I had never gotten off before. Walking in the general direction of the waterfront, I came across deserted parks, housing projects, giant empty grain silos, and 19th-century brick warehouses. It was no wonder that Al Capone started out in that very neighborhood as a small-time criminal and got the wound that lead to his nickname, “Scarface.” It was a late afternoon, and the silence of the streets made me apprehensive. Walking along Beard Street, I saw an abandoned warehouse with a small hole in the fence I could barely fit through. Only after some minutes of being inside did I realize I was already in the six-acre sugar factory complex.